Thursday, July 31, 2014

Follow us:
Follow @NY1 on Twitter Subscribe to this news feed 

News

Poll: NYers Split About Whether Mayor's Policies Favor One Class Over Another

  • Text size: + -
TWC News: Poll: NYers Split About Whether Mayor's Policies Favor One Class Over Another
Play now

Time Warner Cable video customers:
Sign in with your TWC ID to access our video clips.

  To view our videos, you need to
enable JavaScript. Learn how.
install Adobe Flash 9 or above. Install now.

Then come back here and refresh the page.

Mayor Bill de Blasio says he wants to fight inequality, but New Yorkers are divided over whether his policies favor the rich or the poor, and despite his strong ties to Brooklyn, a majority of New Yorkers say the mayor is not demonstrating any borough favoritism. NY1's Grace Rauh filed the following report.

Mayor Bill de Blasio captured City Hall after casting himself as the candidate most willing to uplift poor and struggling New Yorkers.

"The state of our city as we find it today is a tale of two cities, with an inequality gap that fundamentally threatens our future," he said on February 10.

A NY1/New York Times/Siena College poll finds that New Yorkers are somewhat split when deciding whether his policies favor one class over another.

The poll found that 14 percent of New Yorkers think the mayor's administration favors the rich, 23 percent say he favors the middle class, 22 percent say he favors the poor and 29 percent say his administration treats all groups equally. (The numbers have a margin of error of +/- 3 percent.)

When the numbers are broken down by race, a different picture emerges. A plurality of white New Yorkers, 36 percent, say he favors the poor, while a plurality of black and Hispanic New Yorkers say he treats all groups the same.

"He'd like more economic equality, that's for sure, which I think is not very encouraging to people who are aspiring," said one person.

"I think he treats everybody the same," said another.

As for whether the mayor favors one borough over the others, a majority of New Yorkers say he does not. De Blasio lives in the Park Slope section of Brooklyn, but he says he intends to move to Gracie Mansion.

22 percent of New Yorkers say he does treat some boroughs more favorably than others, while 63 percent say he does not. (The numbers have a margin of error of +/- 3 percent.)

"I do not get the impression that he treats all boroughs fairly," said one person.

"I think he sees the city as a whole and is trying to work with it," said another.

When New Yorkers who suspect favoritism were asked which borough gets the most favorable treatment, 46 percent said the mayor's home borough of Brooklyn, 43 percent said Manhattan, 4 percent said Queens and 3 percent said the Bronx. Staten Island came up short, with 0 percent.

10.11.12.248 ClientIP: 54.227.182.191 UserAgent: CCBot/2.0 (http://commoncrawl.org/faq/) Profile: TWCSAMLSP